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Science

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Weather, Forecasting, Satellites

A Better Way to Predict the Weather on Sea and Over Land

Scientists at the Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies (CIMSS) at the University of Wisconsin-Madison have made new updates to old technology that will enable weather forecasters to make improved predictions of severe weather.

Medicine

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sertraline, sertrali, MIND Institute, Uc Davis, SSRI

Sertraline, Brand Named Zoloft, Improves Functioning in Young Children with Fragile X

Treatment with sertraline may provide nominal but important improvements in cognition and social participation in very young children with fragile X syndrome, the most common genetic cause of intellectual disability and the leading single-gene cause of autism, a study by researchers with the UC Davis MIND Institute has found.

Medicine

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Nursing, Long Term Care, Nursing Homes, Nursing Homes, Seniors, , Fall Prediction , Technology, engineeering, sensor system, Sensors, falls in older adults , Falls In Seniors

Sensor Systems Identify Senior Citizens at Risk of Falling Within Three Weeks

Each year, millions of people—especially those 65 and older—fall. Such falls can be serious, leading to broken bones, head injuries, hospitalizations or even death. Now, researchers from the Sinclair School of Nursing and the College of Engineering at the University of Missouri found that sensors that measure in-home gait speed and stride length can predict likely falls. This technology can assist health providers to detect changes and intervene before a fall occurs within a three-week period.

Science

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Tulane Researcher Finds Profound Improvements in Soil Lead Levels Following Katrina

Hurricane Katrina devastated New Orleans 11 years ago, but the storm’s legacy may have a silver lining: reduced levels of lead in soil across the city.

Life

Law and Public Policy

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Presidential Election 2016, Work and Family issues, work balance, family leave, work-family legislation

Expert Available to Comment on Work-Family Legislation

Medicine

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Vitamin A, Structural Biology

Electron Microscopy Reveals How Vitamin A Enters the Cell

Using a new, lightning-fast camera paired with an electron microscope, Columbia University Medical Center scientists have captured images of one of the smallest proteins in our cells to be “seen” with a microscope.

Medicine

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IVF, Assisted Reproduction, Embryo, Embryo Development, Fertility

New Technique Takes Guesswork Out of IVF Embryo Selection

Researchers at the University of Adelaide have successfully trialed a new technique that could aid the process of choosing the "best" embryo for implantation, helping to boost the chances of pregnancy success from the very first IVF cycle.

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Southern, Accent, southern accent, Linguistics, speech and language, Speech

What Makes Southerners Sound Southern?

Linguistic researchers will be isolating and identifying the specific variations in speech that make Southerners sound Southern.

Medicine

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Heart Surgery, simulation training, Richard H. Feins, MD, Nahush A. Mokadam, MD, James I. Fann, MD, patient outcomes, Adverse Events, Surgery residents, Cardiac Surgery Simulation Consortium

Heart Surgery Residents Ready to Save Real Lives After ‘Out of Body’ Training Experience

Simulation training for surgery residents builds confidence and could have a life-saving impact on patients undergoing cardiac surgery, according to two studies published online in The Annals of Thoracic Surgery.

Business

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corporate wellness, Health & Wellness, productivity measurement

Working Well by Being Well

Nearly 90 percent of companies in the United States use some form of employee wellness program – from gym memberships to health screenings to flu shots – all designed to improve health. A study currently under review and co-authored by a faculty member at Washington University in St. Louis empirically tested how these programs affect worker productivity. The research paired individual medical data from employees taking part in a work-based wellness program to their productivity rates over time.

Medicine

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Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center El Paso, smart helmet, concussion detection, Concussion, concussion awareness, Football Head Injury, Football, Football Helmets, Derrick Oaxaca, Space Race, CAI, NASA, tau, Tau Protein, TBI, Traumatic Brain Injury, Brain Injury

Smart Helmet for Football Players May Help Detect Concussions

A smart helmet that can help diagnose concussions in football players is being developed by medical students at Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center El Paso (TTUHSC El Paso).

Life

Education

University of Nebraska Medical Center opens new home for its College of Pharmacy

The new $35 million home for UNMC’s College of Pharmacy boasts state-of-the-art laboratories and education space equipped with next-generation technology and simulation and experiential-learning tools designed to help prepare future pharmacists for expanded roles in a changing health care landscape.

Science

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Earthquake Prediction, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Earthquakes, Earth & Environment, Machine Learning, Computer Aided, Acoustic

​​Expert on Earthquake Prediction Available: Quakes Foretold in Small-Scale Laboratory Experiments Backed by Machine Learning

Science

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Chemistry/Physics/Materials Sciences, Biology; Medicine/Health (Environmental Health, Public Health

Selecting the Right House Plant Could Improve Indoor Air (Animation)

Indoor air pollution is an important environmental threat to human health, leading to symptoms of “sick building syndrome.” But researchers report that surrounding oneself with certain house plants could combat the potentially harmful effects of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), a main category of these pollutants. Interestingly, they found that certain plants are better at removing particular harmful compounds from the air, suggesting that, with the right plant, indoor air could become cleaner and safer

Medicine

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self-driving cars, Self-driving Minivans, Self-driving Software, Autonomous Driving , autonomous systems, Autonomous Vehicles, technology development, technology and engineering

Driving on Instinct: Self-Driving Vehicles Are Making Inroads

Medicine

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Mount Sinai Health System, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Pathology, Carlos Cordon-Cardo, Precise MD

Mount Sinai Establishes Center for Computational and Systems Pathology

Researchers will contribute cutting-edge innovation in personalized precision medicine

Science

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Concussion, Concussion research, Computer Engineering, Microprocessors, Football Head Injury, Brain Injury

Teenager Creates System to Reduce Concussions Among Football Players

Berto Garcia, who will start his second year at Texas Tech, created the system in high school for a science fair project. He now has a provisional patent. He’s 19.

Medicine

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Zika Resource portal , zika virus, Expert Insight, Zika Virus prevention, Betsy Todd, American Journal Of Nursing, Wolters Kluwer Health

Expert Available to Discuss Zika Virus and Infection Prevention

Science

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Michigan Tech, PIRE, NSF, National Science Foundation

Bioenergy Across the Americas

To solve complex global challenges, like the social and environmental impacts of bioenergy development, researchers turn to PIRE. That stands for Partnership in International Research and Education and is a program through the National Science Foundation.

Science

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Chemistry/Physics/Materials Sciences (Materials), Biology (Biomedical/Environmental/Chemical Engineering), Medicine/Health (Cardiology)

After the Heart Attack: Injectable Gels Could Prevent Future Heart Failure (Video)

During a heart attack, clots or narrowed arteries block blood flow, harming or killing cells within the tissue. But the damage doesn’t end after the crushing pain subsides. Instead, the heart’s walls thin out, the organ becomes enlarged, and scar tissue forms. If nothing is done, the patient can eventually experience heart failure. But scientists now report they have developed gels that, in animal tests, can be injected into the heart to shore up weakened areas and prevent heart failure.







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