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Medicine

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Stroke, FAST, BE-FAST, Lahey, tPA

Study Published in Stroke Supports Change to FAST Mnemonic for Stroke

A retrospective study published in Stroke indicates that missed stroke diagnoses can be significantly reduced by adding balance and vision problems to the list of presenting symptoms commonly known as FAST

Medicine

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St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Greg Armstrong, Childhood Cancer Survivor Study, Pediatric Oncology, Epidemiology, cancer control, late effects of cancer, Journal of the American Medical Association

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 28-Feb-2017 11:05 AM EST

Medicine

Science

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Infectious Disease, Insect Management, Agricultural pest control, Mosquito Borne Disease, mosquito control, Wolbachia, cytoplasmic incompatibility

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 27-Feb-2017 11:00 AM EST

Medicine

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Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy, Muscular Dystrophy, Duchenne muscular dystrophy treatments, muscular dystrophy treatments, Inflammation, Muscle Wasting, Shayn Peirce-Cottler, Silvia Blemker, University Of Virginia, UVA, University of Virginia School of Engineering, University of Virginia School of Engineering and Applied Science, UVA engineering school, UVA School of Engineering, UVA School of Engineering and Applied Science, UVA School of Medicine, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Biomedical Engineering, Computer Modeling, medical mysteries, Pediatrics, University of Virginia Department of Biomedical Engineering

UVA Targets Deadly Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy: Why Do Promising Treatments Fail?

If we know what causes Duchenne, why do promising treatments consistently fail? UVA launches innovative new effort to find out.

Medicine

Science

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Sleep, Insomnia, Sensory Processing, Sensory Processing Disorders, Circadian Cycles, Circadian Disruption, Sleep Disorder, Evolution

Tiny Cavefish May Help Humans Evolve to Require Very Little Sleep

We all do it; we all need it – humans and animals alike. Neuroscientists have been studying Mexican cavefish to provide insight into the evolutionary mechanisms regulating sleep loss and the relationship between sensory processing and sleep.

Science

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Titan Shares Her Journey as a 'Black Girl Scientist'

The story of a young African-American woman's journey to become a veterinarian.

Science

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Mass Spectrometry, nanogenerators, Zhong Lin Wang, Chemical Analysis

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 27-Feb-2017 11:00 AM EST

Medicine

Science

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Organ On A Chip, heart on a chip, alternatives to animal testing, Cardiac Disease, Heart Failure

Organ-on-a-Chip Mimics Heart’s Biomechanical Properties

Scientists at Vanderbilt University have created a three-dimensional organ-on-a-chip that can mimic the heart’s amazing biomechanical properties in order to study cardiac disease, determine the effects that different drugs have on the heart and screen for new drugs to treat heart ailments.

Medicine

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EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 27-Feb-2017 4:00 AM EST

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Competition, Workplace Advice

What Do Your Co-Workers Really Think of You?

Everyday in the workplace, colleagues actively compete for a limited amount of perks, including raises, promotions, bonuses and recognition. But new research from Washington University in St. Louis shows that, more than often than not, people fall short in determining which co-workers might be trying to edge them out on the job.

Business

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Neuroscience Lab, Deception, Job Interviews, eye-tracking study

In the Eye of the Beholder: ISU Researchers Use Eye-Tracking Technology to Detect Deception

Iowa State researchers are using eye-tracking technology to better detect when people are lying. They’re specifically interested in cues that may signal deception during job interviews.

Science

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Space, NASA, NASA Ames, Berkeley, Berkeley Lab, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, LBNL, NASA Ames Research Center, Materials, Spacecraft, Heat Shielding, X-rays, X-Ray, Synchrotron, Advanced Light Source, Tomography, Micro, Meteor, Meteorite

When Rocket Science Meets X-Ray Science

NASA and Berkeley Lab researchers have teamed up to explore next-generation spacecraft materials at the microscale using an X-ray technique that produces 3-D images. This work could help ensure future spacecraft survive the rigors of otherworldly atmospheres.

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Transgender, political representation, LGBTQ, LGBTQ issues, Candidates, Public Opinion, transgender political candidates

Transgender Political Candidates Still Likely Face an Uphill Battle, Study Finds

A new study led by a University of Kansas researcher found 35%-40% of adults would oppose a transgender candidate for office, which was higher than the 30% who would likely oppose a gay or lesbian candidate.

Science

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new species, Frogs, Biodiversity

Seven New Species of Night Frogs From the Western Ghats Biodiversity Hotspot Including Four Miniature Forms

Scientists from India have discovered seven new frog species belonging to the Night Frogs genus. Four out of seven of the new species are miniature-sized frogs (12.2–15.4 mm), which can comfortably sit on a coin or a thumbnail. These are among the smallest known frogs in the world.

Science

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NASA, spacecraft design, Space Travel, aerospace design, Engineeriing, Solar Power, Spacecraft technology, NASA Education, Tulane University

Tulane Team Wins NASA’s Big Idea Challenge for Spacecraft Design

Tulane University engineering students’ innovative idea for a flower-shaped, solar-powered space ferry won the top prize in NASA’s BIG Idea Challenge, a national contest to design better ways to assemble spacecraft in space.

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Research, benefits of good news, Positive Psychology, Psychology, Cohabitation, Military Behavioral Health, social psychol, Social Psychiatry Research

Research: Sharing Good News Improves Sleep, Health

SPOKANE, Wash. – New research from Sarah Arpin, assistant professor of psychology at Gonzaga University, concludes that partners who share good news, and believe their partners are receptive and supportive, sleep better. This is likely correlated to a decrease in loneliness and improved overall health, noted Arpin, who presented her research on military couples and relational health at the 2017 Society for Personality and Social Psychology Annual Convention in late January.

Medicine

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Yeast Found in Babies’ Guts Increases Risk of Asthma

University of British Columbia microbiologists have found a yeast in the gut of new babies in Ecuador that appears to be a strong predictor that they will develop asthma in childhood. The new research furthers our understanding of the role microscopic organisms play in our overall health.

Medicine

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Glaucoma, GALA, Event

Glaucoma 360 Benefit Gala Raises $520,000 for Essential Glaucoma Research and Education Programs

The Glaucoma 360 Annual Gala at San Francisco’s historic Palace Hotel honored leaders in glaucoma research innovation and visionary volunteers helping to raise awareness.

Medicine

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Proton Beam Therapy, Radiation Therapy, Cancer, Tumor, cyclotron radiation

UAB to Bring Proton Therapy for Advanced Cancer Treatment to Birmingham

UAB will partner with Proton International to bring proton therapy, one of the most technically advanced forms of cancer-killing radiation, to Alabama. Proton therapy delivers a more precise dose of radiation to a tumor and can avoid damage to healthy surrounding tissue better than conventional X-ray radiation.

Science

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Cell Biology, fish, Zebrafish, Development, Immune System, Macrophage, Cell Migration, tissue development, cell communication

Immune Cell Serves as an Essential Communications Link for Migrating Cells

Scientists at the University of Washington have discovered that macrophages, a common type of cell in the vertebrate immune system, can transmit messages between non-immune cells. Their paper, published online Feb. 16 in the journal Science, is the first reported instance of macrophages relaying messages over a long distance between non-immune cells.







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