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Transgender Candidates, Texas for Trump, Experts on National Security, in the U.S. Politics News Source

Go here for the latest political experts, features and research in U.S. Politics

Medicine

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Duke University, Duke University School of Medicine, Duke Center for Applied Genomics & Precision Medicine, host response, Gene signature, protein signaling, Mass Spectrometry, Mucous, Pathogen detection, Diagnostics, Cold And Flu, Antibiotic Resistance, Flu Pandemic, Global Health

Proteins in Your Runny Nose Could Reveal a Viral Infection

It may seem obvious, but the key to confirming whether someone is suffering from a cold or flu virus might lie at the misery’s source -- the inflamed passages of the nose and throat. Duke Health scientists have identified a group of proteins that, when detected in specific quantities in the mucous, are 86 percent accurate in confirming the infection is from a cold or flu virus, according to a small, proof-of-concept trial published online in the journal EBioMedicine.

Medicine

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lysosomal disease , Nature, Nature (magazine), Research, Genetics, Therapy, press release, news, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Pediatric, Children

Nature Study Suggests New Therapy for Gaucher Disease

Scientists propose in Nature blocking a molecule that drives inflammation and organ damage in Gaucher and maybe other lysosomal storage diseases as a possible treatment with fewer risks and lower costs than current therapies. Reporting their data Feb. 22, the international research team conducted the study in mouse models of lysosomal storage disease and in cells from blood samples donated by people with Gaucher disease.

Medicine

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Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Mount Sinai Health System, Angioedema, Clinical Trial, New England Journal Of Medicine, New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM), Hereditary Angioedema, Genetic Disorders

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 22-Feb-2017 5:00 PM EST

Medicine

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Pneumonia, Influenza, viral pneumonia, Viruses, Disease Prevention, Asthma, Allergies, Drugs, asthma drugs, Accolate, Singulair, repurposing drugs, University Of Virginia, University of Virginia School of Medicine, UVA, UVA School of Medicine, Carter Immunology Center, Beirne B. Carter, Virology, Geriatrics, Infectious Diseases, Thomas J. Braciale, Amber Cardan

Asthma Drugs Could Prevent Deadly Form of Pneumonia, Research Suggests

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Two drugs used to treat asthma and allergies may offer a way to prevent a form of pneumonia that can kill up to 40 percent of people who contract it, researchers at the University of Virginia School of Medicine have found.

Medicine

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zika, Zika infection, Zika research, Diagnostics, Travel, Infection Control, Disease Prevention, Florida, Florida Department of Health, Mosquito, Mosquito Borne Disease, microcephaly , Medical Device

Device Will Rapidly, Accurately and Inexpensively Detect Zika Virus at Airports and Other Sites

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About the size of a tablet, a portable device that could be used in a host of environments like a busy airport or even a remote location in South America, may hold the key to detecting the dreaded Zika virus accurately, rapidly and inexpensively using just a saliva sample. For about $2 and within 15 minutes, researchers hope to accurately determine whether or not an individual has an active infection.

Medicine

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Microbiome, lung, Bacteria, Pulmonary, Lung Disease

New U-M Study Shows How Bacteria Get Into the Lungs; Findings Could Help Disease Research

Human lungs contain many bacteria, which make up a unique microbiome. New research pinpoints just how they get there, and opens the door to more research on what happens to them – and our bodies – as a result.

Medicine

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Opioid Addiction, Buprenorphine, Methadone

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 23-Feb-2017 12:00 PM EST

Medicine

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Blood Pressure, Cardiovascular, Cardiovascular Disease, Diet, Cholesterol, Exercise, Family History, Heart Attack, Heart Health, Heart Health Month, Mayo Clinic National Health Checkup, Prevention, Stress, Weight Management

Mayo Clinic National Health Checkup Shows African-Americans Significantly More Concerned About Heart Health

A new survey by Mayo Clinic revealed that more than two-thirds of African-Americans are concerned about their heart health (71 percent), which is significantly more than Caucasian (41 percent) or Hispanic (37 percent) respondents. Respondents from the South (51 percent) were also significantly more likely to express concern than those in the Northeast (39 percent) or West (35 percent).

Medicine

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zika, Pregnancy, Miscarriage, Placenta

Zika May Cause Miscarriages, Thin Brain Tissue in Babies Carried to Term

Johns Hopkins researchers say that in early pregnancy in mice with complete immune systems, Zika virus can cross the placenta – intended to protect the developing fetus – and appears to lead to a high percentage of miscarriages and to babies born with thin brain tissue and inflammation in brain cells.

Medicine

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Immunity, Immunology, Antibodies, zika, Virus, Vaccine, Birth Defect, Congenital, Dna Vaccines, Clinical Trials

Research Teams Hone in on Zika Vaccines, but Challenges Remain

As public health officials warn that spring’s warmer temperatures may herald another increase of Zika virus infections in the Caribbean and North and South America, researchers around the world are racing to develop safe and effective measures to prevent the disease. In a review paper published today in the journal Immunity, a group of leading vaccine scientists – including Dan H. Barouch, MD, PhD, of Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) – outline advances in the hunt for a Zika vaccine and the challenges that still lie ahead. “The pace of preclinical and early clinical development for Zika vaccines is unprecedented,” said Barouch, corresponding author and director of the Center for Virology and Vaccine Research at BIDMC. “In less than a year, our group and others have demonstrated that multiple vaccine platforms can provide robust protection against Zika virus challenge in animal models. However, unique challenges will need to be addressed in the clinical development of a Zi

Medicine

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Stroke, Physical Therapy, physical therapist

Study on Walking Ability Shows Path to Treatment for Stroke Survivors

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Stroke is the leading cause of disability in older adults in the United States, but research by Clarkson University Physical Therapy Professor George Fulk and his colleagues is pointing the way to recovery for people who are relearning how to walk.

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Experimental Malaria Vaccine Provides Durable Protection Against Multiple Strains in NIH Clinical Trial

An experimental malaria vaccine protected healthy subjects from infection with a malaria strain different from that contained in the vaccine, according to a study published today. The Phase 1 clinical trial is important because in places where malaria is common, there is usually more than one strain of malaria.

Medicine

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T Cell, Vaccination

Penn Team Tracks Rare T Cells in Blood to Better Understand Annual Flu Vaccine

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A team has found a way to identify the small population of circulating helper T cells present in the blood after an annual flu vaccine to monitor their contribution to antibody strength. A technique that identifies these helper immune cells could inform future vaccine design, especially for vulnerable populations.

Medicine

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Micro-RNA May Amplify Effectiveness of Sorafenib in Difficult Liver Cancer Cases

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Only 25% of patients respond to sorafenib treatment, so researchers have endeavored to understand its mechanism of action and discover a way to boost its effectiveness.

Medicine

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Malaria, Infectious Diseases, Global Public Health

New Grant Boosts UC San Diego-Led Malaria Research Program

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An international research team, led by principal investigator Elizabeth A. Winzeler, PhD, professor in the pediatric division of host-microbe systems and therapeutics at University of California San Diego School of Medicine, and colleagues have received a three-year, $4.7 million supplemental grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to advance their development of improved therapies for malaria eradication and elimination.

Medicine

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MU Professor First in Nation to Develop Medical Curriculum Tailored to Native Americans

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Of all racial minorities, Native Americans have the most dramatic health inequalities in the U.S., including significantly higher rates of cardiovascular disease, cancer, Type 2 diabetes and substance abuse. Melissa Lewis, Ph.D., assistant professor in the Department of Family Medicine at the MU School of Medicine, led the first project in the nation to develop a mandatory medical school curriculum about indigenous health.

Science

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Thoroughbred Worker Health and Safety Study Results in Free Bilingual Safety Materials

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Researchers from the University of Maryland, Baltimore and the University of Kentucky College of Public Health create bilingual safety guides for horse farm workers.

Medicine

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Ulcerative Colitis, Inflamamatory Bowel Disease (Ibd), Crohn's Diease, Digestive Diseases, Vitamin D, Vitamin D Levels, Colonoscopy, Relapses, Remission, Cathelicidin, Protein, Microbiome, flare-up, clinical remission, Colon, colon disease, Gastroenterology And Hepatology

Lower Serum Vitamin D During Remission Increases Risk of Clinical Relapse in Patients with Ulcerative Colitis

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A new study led by researchers at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) has found that lower levels of vitamin D in the blood increase the risk of clinical relapse in patients with Ulcerative Colitis (UC), an inflammatory bowel disease that causes long-lasting inflammation and ulcers in the colon. The study was published in the February issue of the journal Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

Medicine

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Infectious Diseases, Aaas Fellow, Biomedical Sciences, Medical Eduction, Scientists, infectious microorganisms, Immunology, Biomedical Research, Aaas Public Engagement Fellows

NYITCOM’s Martinez Named AAAS Leshner Leadership Institute Public Engagement Fellow

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Luis Martinez, Ph.D., is an infectious disease researcher selected as a Fellow in the second cohort of the AAAS Alan I. Leshner Leadership Institute for Public Engagement with Science.







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