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UF/IFAS Scientist to Spread Knowledge at World Avocado Congress

With the laurel wilt pathogen threatening the Florida avocado industry, a UF/IFAS tropical fruit scientist will lend his expertise at the September meeting in Lima, Peru. The avocado industry, which is estimated to have a $100 million dollar a year impact on Florida's economy, is in real danger, the scientist says.

Medicine

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Family Farm Managers Earn Less, but Gain ‘Emotional’ Wealth

After hours harvesting forage, managing livestock and milking cows, new Cornell University agricultural economic research shows family members who work on the family dairy farm make $22,000 less annually than comparable hired managers, but are handsomely compensated with “socioemotional” wealth.

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UD Researchers Examine Sweet Corn Damage Caused by Stink Bugs

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Researchers are taking a closer look at how brown marmorated stink bugs are causing damage to developing ears of sweet corn, the results of which could lead to better pest management strategies for growers.

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Company Developed Through University Technology Incubator Helps Ranchers Reduce Water-Related Costs, Addresses Global Water Insecurity

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Remote Well Solutions, which produces fully automated, off-grid water pumping systems that allow ranchers to reduce costs related to time, fuel, water and maintenance, is one of 12 companies from around the United States – including three from New Mexico – to be selected for the Village Capital Water US 2015 program. The six-month program aims to support entrepreneurs in addressing global water insecurity issues through technology.

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Entomologists Sniff Out New Stink Bug to Help Soybean Farmers Control Damage

Entomologists in Texas got a whiff of a new stink bug doing economic damage to soybeans in Texas and are developing ways to help farmers combat it, according to a report in the journal Environmental Entomology.

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Being a Graduate Student Away From a University Can Stink but in a Good Way

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Each year, graduate students may be stationed at remote Texas A&M AgriLife Research locations around the state to help with various studies. Researchers agree that having graduate students is a boon for science.

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Drought, Labor Issues Continue to Impact Chile Harvests in New Mexico. Experts Available to Talk About Crop Expectations, Research and Future

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UF/IFAS Program Highly Successful in Keeping Phosphorus Out of the Everglades

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A 20-year plan to dramatically reduce phosphorus levels of agricultural water entering the Florida Everglades is working.

Life

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Stony Brook University Helps Prepare Next Generation of Farmers by Introducing a Hydroponic ‘Freight Farm’ On Campus

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This fall, Stony Brook University is introducing a fresh new technology – a hydroponic Freight Farm – where student farmers can grow crops year-round in an indoor environment. Created in a discarded shipping container converted into a fully operational hydroponic farm known as the Leafy Green Machine, the Freight Farm will be primarily managed by Stony Brook students. Using the latest in farm-management technologies such as cloud-synced growth data, live camera feeds and a smartphone app that monitors and controls light levels inside the container anytime, anywhere, the students will get hands-on experience planting and harvesting lettuce, and Campus Dining will use the fresh produce to feed the student body. Stony Brook University is the first higher education campus to offer students a hydroponic Freight Farm.

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Rural Mainstreet Index Falls to Growth Neutral for August

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A monthly survey of independent bankers in a 10-state region indicates slower economic growth in the months ahead.