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With Unique Data, Researchers Track the Impact of Brazil’s ‘Soy Moratorium’ on an Advancing Agricultural Frontier

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Research appearing in PLOS ONE suggests the 2006 Soy Moratorium had a larger effect in reducing deforestation in the Amazon than has been previously understood.

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Climate Change, ocean acidifcation, Global Warming, increased co2, Marine Biology, Food Webs

Ocean Warming to Cancel Increased CO2-Driven Productivity

University of Adelaide researchers have constructed a marine food web to show how climate change could affect our future fish supplies and marine biodiversity.

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soil, CORN, Biofuel, Corn Stover, Erosion, Maize, Ethanol

Biofuel: Corn with a Cover of Grass

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Corn raised for biofuel can result in eroded soils, as all materials are removed from the field. However, using a perennial grass groundcover could preserve soil in addition to reducing costs.

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UF Study: Family, Friends Are First Source for Food Safety Info

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Contaminated food puts humans at risk of serious illness worldwide. With that in mind, UF/IFAS researchers wanted to know how people get their information about food safety and what sources they trust.

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Honey Bees

Common Pesticide Damages Honey Bee’s Ability to Fly

Biologists at UC San Diego have provided the first evidence that a widely used pesticide can significantly impair the ability of otherwise healthy honey bees to fly. The study, which employed a bee “flight mill,” raises concerns about how pesticides affect honey bee pollination and long-term effects on the health of honey bee colonies.

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As UF/IFAS CREC Turns 100, It Celebrates Decades Working with Florida Department of Citrus

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“Housing the FDOC and CREC scientists at the same location has brought together the expertise needed to address any issue facing the Florida citrus industry, from the field to the grocery store shelf, and everywhere in between,” said Michael Rogers, director of the Citrus REC.

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Biochar, terra preta, Northern Arizona University, Amazon Basin, Tropics, temperate zone, Bruce Hungate, Ecoss, Center for Ecosystem Science and Society

No Biochar Benefit for Temperate Zone Crops, Says New Report

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Scientists believe that biochar, the partially burned remains of plants, has been used as fertilizer for at least 2,000 years in the Amazon Basin. Since initial studies published several years ago promoted biochar, farmers around the world have been using it as a soil additive to increase fertility and crop yields. But a new study casts doubt on biochar’s efficacy, finding that using it only improves crop growth in the tropics, with no yield benefit at all in the temperate zone.

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Utrafast Imaging, Smallest Transistor, Electronic Cyclones, Sensor-Filled Glove, and More in the Engineering News Source

The latest research and features in the Newswise Engineering News Source

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Climate Change, Grand Canyon, vegitation, Drought, NAU, Northern Arizona University

NAU Research Suggests Climate Change Likely to Cause Significant Shift in Grand Canyon Vegetation

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Decreases in river flows and frequency of flooding with future climate warming will likely shift vegetation along the Colorado River in Grand Canyon to species with more drought-tolerant traits.

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Seeds, Bioinspiration, mobility strategies, awn, soil digging, Humidity, natural design, Mechanics, granular drag, Wonjong Jung, Sung Mock Choi, Wonjung Kim, Ho-Young Kim, Seoul National University, Sogang University, PHYSICS OF FLUIDS

Nature Plants a Seed of Engineering Inspiration

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Researchers in South Korea have quantitatively deconstructed what they describe as the “ingenious mobility strategies” of seeds that self-burrow rotationally into soil. Seeds maneuvered to dig into soil using a coiled appendage, known as an awn, that responds to humidity. The team investigated this awn’s burrowing and discovered how the nubile sprouts seem to mimic a drill to bury themselves. Their findings, published in Physics of Fluids, could have dramatic implications for improving agricultural robotics.







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