Location:

Local - Maryland

Add to Favorites | Subscribe | Share

Filters:

  • (Press "esc" to clear)

Medicine

Channels:

Majority of Opioid Medications Not Safely Stored in Homes with Children, Survey Finds

Nearly 70 percent of prescription opioid medications kept in homes with children are not stored safely, a new study by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health finds.

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Channels:

Underage Drinking, alcohol marketing, Internet alcohol marketing

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 20-Feb-2017 5:00 PM EST

Medicine

Channels:

Suicide Attempts, Suicide Awareness and Prevention, Teenage suicide, same-sex marriage, Sexual Orientation

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 20-Feb-2017 11:00 AM EST

Science

Channels:

Tissue Engineering, Nervous System, Intestinal, Diabetes

Researchers Engineer Intestinal Tissue with Functioning Nervous System

Picture1.png

For the first time, NIH-funded researchers have used stem cells to grow intestinal tissues with a functioning nervous system. The advance creates new opportunities for studying intestinal diseases, nutritional health, and diabetes. It also brings researchers one step closer to growing patient-specific human intestines for transplant.

Science

Channels:

Materials, Glass Display, Physics, Chemistry

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 21-Feb-2017 11:00 AM EST

Science

Channels:

Biochemistry, Molecular Biology, Zoology

Biochemical Tricks of the Hibernating Bear

WEB_JournalNews_-_Bear.jpg

Winter is in full swing, and many of us have fantasized about curling up in a warm cave and slumbering until the warmth of spring arrives, just like a bear. Bears have the ability to sleep away the harsh winter months when food is scarce. They can spend five to seven months in hibernation. During this time, bears do not eat, drink, excrete or exercise. Despite the length of inactivity, bears do not experience bone loss, muscle loss, heart complications or blood clots like humans do during extended bouts of inactivity.

Medicine

Channels:

Experimental Biology 2017, Faseb, Anatomy, Physiological, Biochemistry, Molecular Biology, Pathology, Nutrition, Pharmacology

Speakers Announced for 2017 Experimental Biology Meeting

World-renowned scientists will present pioneering research and discuss key issues affecting the life sciences at the 2017 Experimental Biology meeting (EB 2017), the premier annual meeting of six scientific societies in Chicago to be held April 22–26.

Medicine

Channels:

zika, Pregnancy, Miscarriage, Placenta

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 21-Feb-2017 5:00 AM EST

Life

Law and Public Policy

Channels:

Gun Violence, Gun Policy, campus carry, mass shootings

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School Gun Policy Expert Available To Discuss Campus Carry Measures

danielwebster_1.jpg

Life

Education

Channels:

Johns Hopkins Carey Business School, business school accreditation, Business School, Aacsb, Higher Education

Johns Hopkins Carey Business School Earns AACSB Accreditation

The Johns Hopkins Carey Business School has earned accreditation from the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB), the world’s leading authority on the quality assurance of business school programs. AACSB accreditation is considered a “hallmark of excellence” in business education.

Medicine

Channels:

Charles Holmes, Annual Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections

Tip Sheet: Johns Hopkins Researchers Present Findings at Science Conference in Seattle

The Annual Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections

Science

Channels:

light flashes, oxidative metabolism, biomedical diagnostics, light detection, Oxidative Stress, early-stage diagnostics, Michael Poplova, Eduard P.A. Van Wijk, Michal Cifra

Flashes of Light Offer Potential for Biomedical Diagnostics

BPS_Cifra-light-flashes.gif

A group of researchers from the Czech Republic were intrigued that living organisms emit small amounts of light resulting during oxidative metabolism, when oxygen is used to create energy by breaking down carbohydrates. The researchers began to think about how detecting this light could have potential for biomedical diagnostics. At the Biophysical Society’s meeting, Feb. 11-15, 2017, Michal Cifra will present the group’s work within this realm.

Science

Channels:

food dye, Allura red, food monitoring, Pharmaceutical, Food Quality, food stability, Food Safety, Fluorescent, Physical Properties, Bogumil Zelent, Rahul Chib, Sarah Waxman, Alexia Ciarfella, Maria Corradini, Richard D. Ludescher, Rutgers University, University Of Pennsylvania, University Of Massachusetts, Biophysical Society 61st Meeting, Biophysical Societ

The Glow of Food Dye Can Be Used to Monitor Food Quality

BPS-Ludescher-pipetting-allura-red.jpg

Allura Red, a synthetic food and pharmaceutical color widely used within the U.S., boasts special properties that may make it and other food dyes appropriate as sensors or edible probes to monitor foods and pharmaceuticals. A team of researchers -- from Rutgers University, the University of Pennsylvania and the University of Massachusetts -- recently made this discovery during an extension of their work identifying and characterizing molecules in foods or food ingredients that might provide signals of food quality, stability or safety.

Medicine

Channels:

flu, cyro-electron tomography, Influenza, Viruses, Frozen, Erin Tran, K. Podolsky, A. Bartesaghi, O. Kuybeda, G. Grandinetti, T. Wohlbold, G. Tan, R. Nachbagauer, P. Palese, F. Krammer, S. Subramaniam, National Institutes Of Health (NIH), Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Biophysical Society 61st Meeting, Biophysical Society

The Flu Gets Cold

BPS-influenza-virus-NIH.jpg

In an effort to one day eliminate the need for an annual flu shot, a group of researchers from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai are exploring the surface of influenza viruses, which are covered by a protein called “hemagglutinin” (HA). This particular protein is used like a key by viruses to open cells and infect them, making it an ideal target for efforts to help the body's immune system fight off a wide range of influenza strains.

Science

Channels:

Plants, Drought, drought resistance, abscisic acid, ABA hormone, Molecular, Protein, molecule interactions, Saurabh Shukla, Moeen Meigooni, Chuankai Zhao, Diwakar Shukla, University Of Illinois, Biophysical Society 61st Meeting, Biophysical Society

How a Plant Resists Drought

Climate change will bring worsening droughts that threaten crops. One potential way to protect crops is by spraying them with a compound that induces the plants to become more drought resistant. Now, by identifying the key molecular mechanism that enables a plant to minimize water loss, researchers may be one step closer to that goal.

Medicine

Science

Channels:

Alzheimer's Disease, Calcium, cell energy, Mitochondria, Protein, Cell Culture, Gene, Disease Development, Pooja Jadiya, Alyssa A. Lombardi, Jonathan P. Lambert, Timothy S. Luongo, Jin Chu, Domenico Praticò, John W. Elrod, Temple University, Biophysical Society 61st Meeting, Biophysical Society

Imbalance of Calcium in a Cell's Energy Factory May Drive Alzheimer's Disease

Calcium in the mitochondria -- the energy factory of cells -- may be one of the keys to understanding and treating Alzheimer's disease and dementia. Researchers at Temple University have now identified how an imbalance of calcium ions in the mitochondria may contribute to cell death and, specifically, neurodegeneration in brain cells during Alzheimer's and dementia. The findings could eventually point to new therapies for preventing or delaying these diseases. The team will present its work during the 61st Meeting of the Biophysical Society.

Medicine

Channels:

Alzheimer's Disease, Peptides, Neurodegenerative Diseases, cell toxicity, amyloid hypothesis, Antonio De Maio, Isabel Rivera, David M. Cauvi , Nelson Arispe, University of California, San Diego, Biophysical Society 61st Meeting, Biophysical Society

New Understandings of Cell Death Show Promise for Preventing Alzheimer’s

Currently, the predominant theory behind Alzheimer’s disease is the “amyloid hypothesis,” which states that abnormally increased levels of amyloid beta (Aβ) peptides outside of brain cells produce a variety of low molecular weight Aβ aggregates that are toxic to the nervous system. These Aβ aggregates interact directly with target cells and lead to cell death. During the Biophysical Society’s meeting, being held Feb. 11-15, 2017, Antonio De Maio will present his work hunting for the specific mechanisms behind Aβ-induced toxicity to cells, or cytoxicity.

Science

Channels:

disease therapeutics, cellular process, Autophagy, Protein, Beclin-1, Therapeutic, Matthew Ranaghan, Colin Garvie, Doug Daniels, Beth Levin, Jose Perez, Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, University of Dayton, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Biophysical Society 61st Meeting, Biophysical Society

New Protein Development May Hold the Key to New Disease Therapeutics

The 2016 Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine was awarded the for discoveries of mechanisms of autophagy, a cellular process much like recycling, where new cellular components are generated from old and damaged ones. Though a relatively simple process conceptually, autophagy plays an important role in many physiological processes and genes essential to the process could be a key component for treating diseases. Now, researchers have reported the first bacterial creation and functional analysis of a protein essential to initiate autophagy: a human homologous gene of Beclin-1. The researchers will present their findings during the Biophysical Society meeting, Feb. 11-15, 2017.

Science

Channels:

Lasers, vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs), Semiconductor, gas sensing, Gas Sensors, Wavelength, mid-infrared region, Ganpath Kumar Veerabathran, Stephan Sprengel, Alexander Andrejew , Markus-Christian Amann, Applied Physics Letters

Extending VCSEL Wavelength Coverage to the Mid-Infrared

There are several important gases that are detectable with mid-infrared light, having wavelengths between 3-4 micrometers. Application-grade Vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs), however, aren’t yet available for this wavelength range, but the increasing need for compact, portable and affordable gas sensors is spurring demand for energy-efficient semiconductor sources of mid-IR light. Addressing this demand, a group of researchers set out to develop a concept to extend the wavelength coverage of VCSELs into this important regime.

Science

Channels:

Nanodiamond, Quantum Mechanics, quantum sensing, Nanocrystals, X-ray imaging, nanodiamond healing, Stephan O. Hruszkewycz, Wonsuk Cha, Paolo Andrich, Christopher P. Anderson, Andrew Ulvestad, Ross Harder, Paul Fuoss, David D. Awschalom, F. Joseph P. Heremans, Argonne National Laboratory, University Of Chicago, APL Materials

Turning Up the Heat for Perfect (Nano)Diamonds

For use in quantum sensing, the bulk nanodiamond crystal surrounding the point defect must be highly perfect. Any deviation from perfection will adversely affect the quantum behavior of the material. Highly perfect nanodiamonds are also quite expensive and difficult to make. A cheaper alternative, say researchers, is to take defect-ridden, low-quality, commercially manufactured diamonds, and then “heal” them. In APL Materials, they describe a method to heal diamond nanocrystals under high-temperature conditions.







Chat now!