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Medicine

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Alzheimer's Disease, Georgetown University Medical Center, Howard Fillit, Nilotinib, repurposing cancer drugs, R. Scott Turner, Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, Cognitive Impairment, Neuroinflammation, misfiled proteins, atophagy, plaques and tangles, tau, beta-amyloid, Charbel Moussa, Georgetown Memory Disorders Program, anti-neurodegenerative drug, Georgetown University Medical Center Translational Neurotherapeutics Program, Drug Development, tyrosine kinase inhibitor, venture philanthropy

New Clinical Trial Will Test Cancer Drug as Alzheimer’s Treatment

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The Alzheimer’s Drug Discovery Foundation (ADDF) announces a $2.1 million grant awarded to R. Scott Turner, MD, PhD, of Georgetown University Medical Center to conduct a phase II clinical trial of low-dose nilotinib (marketed as Tasigna® for use as a cancer therapy) in patients with Alzheimer’s disease.

Medicine

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Dr. Walter Rocca, Estrogen, Medical Research, Minnesota News Releases, news releases, Oophorectomy, Ovarian Cancer, Ovary Removal

Ovarian Removal to Prevent Ovarian Cancer Should Not Be an Option for Premenopausal Women, Mayo Research Finds

A Mayo Clinic research team has found evidence suggesting that the controversial practice of ovary removal in premenopausal women to prevent ovarian cancer should be discontinued in women who are not at high risk of cancer.

Medicine

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Frailty, Older Patients, Dr. Mark Ferguson, Dr. Angela Beckert, University Of Chicago, Surgery

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 6-Oct-2016 12:00 AM EDT

Science

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Peter Schultz, Heinrich Wieland, Boehringer Ingelheim Foundation, Germany science prize

TSRI’s Peter Schultz Wins Prestigious Heinrich Wieland Prize

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Peter Schultz, president of The Scripps Research Institute, has been awarded the international Heinrich Wieland Prize, one of Germany’s most prestigious scientific prizes.

Medicine

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Alzheimers disease, Food And Drug Administration, Nilotinib, Phase II clinical trial, randomized clinical trial

Georgetown Receives FDA Clearance to Conduct Clinical Trial with Nilotinib in Alzheimer’s Disease

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Georgetown University Medical Center today announces the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has completed its review of an investigational new drug application (IND) for the use of nilotinib in a phase II clinical trial for patients with mild to moderate Alzheimer’s disease.

Science

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Agriculture, Soil Science, Environment, Human Health, Environmental Health

One Health Environmental Program Topic of Symposium

Agriculture and soil science fit with environmental health

Medicine

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St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Infectious Disease, inflammasome, Immunology, IRGB10 , danger-sensing proteins, Cytoplasm, Interferon

Scientists Reveal How Signals From Pathogenic Bacteria Reach Danger Sensors of Cells

St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital scientists show that IRGB10, an essential protein induced by the signaling protein interferon, is needed to activate danger-sensing proteins in the cytoplasm of cells.

Medicine

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Hypertension in children, High blood pressure in children, cognitive issues, Cognitive Skills, The Journal of Pediatrics

Childhood Hypertension Associated with Cognitive Issues

Hypertension, more commonly known as high blood pressure, has increased significantly in children, paralleling the current childhood obesity epidemic. Although we know that adult hypertension can affect the brain, little research has been done on the cognitive effects of childhood hypertension. In a new study scheduled for publication in The Journal of Pediatrics, researchers found that hypertension is associated with cognitive issues in children and adolescents.

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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police brutality, Crime, Black Lives Matter, Police, Race, African Americans, Law Enforcement, police misconduct, Matthew Desmond, crime reporting

Police Violence Against Unarmed Black Men Results in Loss of Thousands of Crime-Related 911 Calls

A new study shows that publicized cases of police violence against unarmed black men have a clear and significant negative impact on citizen crime reporting, specifically 911 calls.

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Obesity and Adolescents, Obesity, Mindful Eating, Childhood Obesity, Healthy Eating, Family, Food, Physical Health, Nutrition, Nutrition & Children, Division of Responsibility, healthy weight, Obesity Prevention

Preventing Obesity with Mindful Eating

Dr. Lenna Liu, a pediatrician at Seattle Children’s explains mindful eating and give tips for how to create a warm, caring and supportive environment around food for your family.

Medicine

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Critical Care, Nursing, HIV, Cardiovacular Disease, Living with HIV, Duke University School of Nursing

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A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 3-Oct-2016 6:00 AM EDT

Science

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Water Quality, Streams, Pollution, Water Pollution, Northern Ireland, cow, Runoff, Environment, Manure

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 5-Oct-2016 9:00 AM EDT

Medicine

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Kimon Bekelis, CNS Innovation Award, Sam Hassenbusch Young Neurosurgeon Award, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, , The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice, CNS Annual Meeting, Health Policy, Ranking Surgeons, Innovation in neurosurgery

Kimon Bekelis, MD, Receives Two Awards at the 2016 Congress of Neurological Surgeons Annual Meeting: The 2016-17 CNS Innovation Fellowship and the Sam Hassenbusch Young Neurosurgeon Award

Kimon Bekelis, MD, is a cerebrovascular/endovascular fellow at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital and instructor of health policy at The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice.

Medicine

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zika, Infectious Disease

Case Study Reports Details of Mysterious Utah Zika-Related Death

Researchers at the University of Utah School of Medicine and ARUP Laboratories in Salt Lake City unravel the mystery behind a rare Zika-related death in an adult, and unconventional transmission to a second patient in a correspondence published online on September 28 in the New England Journal of Medicine. Details point to an unusually high concentration of virus in the first patient’s blood as being responsible for his death. The phenomenon may also explain how the second patient may have contracted the virus by touching tears or sweat from the primary patient, the first such documented case.

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c-section, C-sections, Antibiotic, Azithromycin, Women's Health, Clinical Trial, clinical trial outcomes, practice change, Obstetrics

Administering Additional Antibiotic Prior to C-Section Reduces Infection Rates by 50 Percent

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The change of practice in C-section delivery improves the health of mom and baby.

Medicine

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Asthma, Children, inner-city, Treatment, Child, Treatment Response

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 5-Oct-2016 9:00 AM EDT

Medicine

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Air Pollution, Fine Particulate Matter, Nitrogen Dioxide, Air Pollutants, Indoor Air Pollution, Indoor Air Quality, Health Outcomes, Respiratory, Pulmonary, Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 30-Sep-2016 12:15 AM EDT

Science

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marshland, floating marshland, pond remediation, Pond Scum, stormwater runoff, Water Quality, turbidity reduction

Southeastern Experiments with Floating Marshland to Clean Stormwater Runoff

A Southeastern Louisiana University wetlands expert and graduate student are implementing a pilot project in an eight-acre pond to determine the feasibility of floating marshlands serving as a filter to clean ponds and other small bodies of water.

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Do Race-Based Stressors Contribute to the Achievement Gap?

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Stress of racial discrimination may help explain racial/ethnic differences in achievement

Medicine

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Cancer, Technology, Big Data, Medicine, Medicine & Health, Smartphone, wearable devices, Kinect

University of Southern California to Show How Wearable Technology Can Improve Cancer Treatment

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Researchers at the University of Southern California will demonstrate how using wearable technology and smartphones can improve cancer treatment at a White House event on Oct. 3. The USC project will be one of the participants in the Cancer Moonshot exhibit championed by Vice President Joe Biden. Researchers aim to provide doctors with real-time patient data from wearable technology and patient-reported experiences so that physicians can base their treatment decisions on objective measures rather than just subjective and episodic observations.







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