For Women at Risk of Hereditary Breast Cancer, Multigene Test Could Help Extend Life Expectancy

Findings Indicate That Next-Generation Sequencing of a 7-Gene Panel is Cost-Effective According to World Health Organization Guidelines

Article ID: 673052

Released: 17-Apr-2017 10:45 AM EDT

Source Newsroom: International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR)

Newswise — Princeton, NJ—April 17, 2017—Value in Health, the official journal of the International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR), announced today the publication of new research indicating that testing for variants in 7 cancer-associated genes (versus the usual process of testing in just 2 genes) followed by risk-reduction management could cost-effectively improve life expectancy for women at risk of hereditary breast cancer. The report of these findings, A Multigene Test Could Cost-Effectively Help Extend Life Expectancy for Women at Risk of Hereditary Breast Cancer, was published in the April 2017 issue.  

Using hypothetical cohorts of women at risk of hereditary breast cancer, the authors used a decision-analytic model to compare the relative cost and effectiveness of two test strategies for detecting pathogenic genetic variants: 1) the usual BRCA1/2 test strategy, and 2) a next-generation 7-gene strategy that tests for variants not only in BRCA1 and BRCA2, but also in TP53, PTEN, CDH1, STK11, and PALB2. The authors then used these test results to select appropriate breast cancer risk reduction treatments / therapies.

In the base-case scenario for 50- and 40-year-old women undergoing genetic testing, the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) for the 7-gene test strategy compared with the BRCA1/2 test strategy was $42,067 and $23,734 per life-year gained, or $69,920 and $48,328 per quality-adjusted life-year gained, respectively. At these ICER levels, the 7-gene test strategy would be considered cost effective according to the World Health Organization guidelines.

“Pathogenic variants in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes explain only about 15% of the breast cancer familial relative risk,” said lead author Yonghong Li, PhD, Quest Diagnostics, USA, “while pathogenic variants in other genes, including TP53, PTEN, CDH1, and PALB2 contribute further to the familial relative risk. The results of this study,” Dr. Li added, “demonstrate the potential value of newer testing options that allow for the simultaneous analysis of expanded panels of additional genes whose pathogenic variants confer moderate to high risk for breast cancer.” 

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ABOUT ISPOR
The International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR) is a nonprofit, international, educational and scientific organization that promotes health economics and outcomes research excellence to improve decision making for health globally.
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ABOUT VALUE IN HEALTH
Value in Health (ISSN 1098-3015) is an international, indexed journal that publishes original research and health policy articles that advance the field of health economics and outcomes research to help health care leaders make evidence-based decisions. The journal’s 2015 impact factor score is 3.824. Value in Health is ranked 3rd out of 74 journals in health policy and services (social sciences), 8th out of 87 journals in health care sciences and services, and 10th out of 344 journals in economics (social sciences). Value in Health publishes 10 issues a year and circulates to more than 10,000 readers around the world. Web: www.ispor.org/valueinhealth | Twitter: http://bit.ly/ISPORjournals-T (@ISPORjournals)

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