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On-Air Shooting Highlights ‘American Phenomenon’ of Disgruntled Former Employee, UB Trauma Expert Says

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Scientists Show How Exposure to Brief Trauma and Sudden Sounds Form Lasting Memories

Researchers at NYU Langone Medical Center have found how even brief exposure to sudden sounds or mild trauma can form permanent, long-term brain connections, or memories, in a specific region of the brain. Moreover, the research team, working with rats, says it was able to chemically stimulate those biological pathways in the locus coeruleus — the area of the brain best known for releasing the “fight or flight” hormone noradrenaline — to heighten and improve the animals’ hearing.

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Siri ‘Butt Dial’ to 911 Brings Rescuers to Trapped Victim

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A Vanderbilt patient who survived the unthinkable has brought a whole new meaning to the term “butt dialing” and believes that prayer, along with a little help from Siri, saved his life.

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Color-Changing Polymer May Signal Traumatic Brain Injuries in Soldiers, Athletes (Video)

A bomb blast or a rough tackle can inflict serious brain damage. Yet at the time of impact, these injuries are often invisible. To detect head trauma immediately, a team of researchers has developed a polymer-based material that changes colors depending on how hard it is hit. The goal is to someday incorporate this material into protective headgear. They will describe their approach at the 250th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

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College Football Head Impact Study Suggests Steps to Reduce Risk

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Despite growing concerns about concussions, the NCAA has not regulated full-contact football practices, arguing that there’s insufficient data available about head impacts. A new study from the University of Virginia School of Medicine begins to address that lack of data, detailing the number and severity of subconcussive head impacts over the course of an entire season. The researchers conclude that the NCAA’s lack of regulation comes at a cost to college players that seems “unnecessarily high” and call for changes to reduce head impacts.

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Head Impacts and Collegiate Football Practice and Games

Researchers at the University of Virginia (UVa) examined the number and severity of subconcussive head impacts sustained by college football players over an entire season during practices and games. The researchers found that the number of head impacts varied depending on the intensity of the activity.

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Without Complete Certainty, Families of Passengers on Malaysian Jet Will Always Cling to Hope, UB Trauma Expert Says

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"Concussions Most Common During Practice." Pre-Season Tips for Students, Coaches, and Parents

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Blood Test Predicts Prognosis for Traumatic Brain Injuries

A new blood test could help emergency room doctors quickly diagnose traumatic brain injury and determine its severity. The findings, published July 10 in the Journal of Neurotrauma, could help identify patients who might benefit from extra therapy or experimental treatments.

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Researchers Identify Model to Predict Successful Wound Healing

Battlefield surgeons and civilian physicians could have a powerful new tool to help patients recover from traumatic injuries, including life-threatening wounds from explosions.