Obesity News Source

Wednesday 25-May-2016

Recent Research

Obese Young Adults Unaware of Kidney Disease Risk, Study Finds

Many young adults with abdominal obesity exhibit a readily detectable risk factor for chronic kidney disease (CKD), yet the vast majority don’t know they’re at risk, according to a study of nationwide health data led by Albert Einstein College of Medicine researchers that was published online today in the journal PLOS ONE.

–Albert Einstein College of Medicine|2016-05-25

SR Scales Introduces New Stand-on Scale for Improved Patient Safety

SR Instruments, a leading manufacturer of purpose-built scales for hospitals, medical facilities, and long-term care centers today announced the addition of a new stand-on scale, the SR585i, to its SR Scales product line.

–SR Instruments, Inc.|2016-05-24

The UC Nutrition Policy Institute Drives a Drinking Water Movement

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The Nutrition Policy Institute (NPI) in Oakland has been funded to serve as the hub of a new national alliance that works on issues in drinking water safety, access and consumption.

–University of California - Division of Agriculture and Natural Resources|2016-05-24

Low Hormone Levels Linked to Obesity in Teens

Obese teenagers already show signs of hormonal differences from normal-weight peers that may make them prone to weight gain, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society’s Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

–Endocrine Society|2016-05-24

FDA Finalizes New Food Nutrition Labels

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The FDA recently unveiled the new required nutritional information label for packaged foods, the first significantly refreshed design in more than 20 years. Experts believe the new label will make it easier for consumers to make informed decisions about their health and the foods they eat.

–Texas A&M University|2016-05-24

Sugar Substitutes May Cut Calories, but No Health Benefits for Individuals with Obesity

Artificial sweeteners help individuals with obesity to cut calories and lose weight but may have negative health effects, according to researchers at York University's Faculty of Health.

–York University|2016-05-24

Rates of Obesity, Diabetes Lower in Neighborhoods That Are More Walkable

Urban neighborhoods in Ontario, Canada, that were characterized by more walkable design were associated with decreased prevalence of overweight and obesity and decreased incidence of diabetes between 2001 and 2012, according to a study appearing in the May 24/31 issue of JAMA.

–JAMA - Journal of the American Medical Association|2016-05-24

Teen Health Depends on Location, Location, Location

The real estate maxim about the importance of location is true for teenagers too. Their intellectual and physical health depends on location, location, location.

–Cornell University|2016-05-23

Childhood Fitness Reduces Long-Term Cardiovascular Risks of Childhood Obesity

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Aerobic exercise may reduce the long-term health risks of childhood obesity.

–University of Georgia|2016-05-23

Drop in Childhood Obesity Cannot Be Explained by Health Behaviors, The Latest in Heart Defect Prediction Tech, Eating After 8pm Not Linked to Childhood Obesity, and more Children's Health News

Click to visit the Children's Health Channel

– Newswise|2016-05-23

Experts: New Nutrition Labels Positive, But Don’t Expect Major Behavioral Changes

–Texas Tech University|2016-05-20

Escaping the Silos

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The Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux Community and American Heart Association join forces to improve health outcomes in Indian Country with Fertile Ground II: Growing the Seeds of Native Health.

–Voices for Healthy Kids|2016-05-19

Drop in Childhood Obesity Cannot Be Explained by Health Behaviors

While a reported drop in obesity rates among U.S. children has been heralded as positive news, more work must be done to understand exactly why that drop occurred, according to researchers at Rice and Temple universities.

–Rice University|2016-05-19

Hamburg, Shalala, Glickman, Angell Headline Food Law Conference at Georgetown University

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Former FDA Commissioner Margaret Hamburg, Clinton Foundation President and former U.S. Secretary of Health Donna E. Shalala, former U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Dan Glickman, and Sonia Angell, deputy commissioner for the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene headline a unique conference focused on food issues, “Vote Food 2016: Better Food, Better Health,” on June 3 in Washington, DC.

–O'Neill Institute for National & Global Health Law|2016-05-18

Bright Light Alters Metabolism

Exposure to bright light alters your metabolism, reports a new study. Scientists found bright light exposure increased insulin resistance compared to dim light exposure in both the morning and the evening. In the evening, bright light also caused higher peak glucose (blood sugar) levels. Over time, excess blood glucose can result in increased body fat, weight gain and a higher risk for diabetes.

–Northwestern University|2016-05-18

Hamburg, Shalala, Glickman, Angell Headline Food Law Conference at Georgetown University

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Former FDA Commissioner Margaret Hamburg, Clinton Foundation President and former U.S. Secretary of Health Donna E. Shalala, former U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Dan Glickman, and Sonia Angell, deputy commissioner for the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene headline a unique conference focused on food issues, “Vote Food 2016: Better Food, Better Health,” on June 3 in Washington, DC.

–O'Neill Institute for National & Global Health Law|2016-05-18

No Link Between Eating Dinner After 8 p.m. And Obesity in Children

Researchers at King's College London have found no significant link between eating the evening meal after 8pm and excess weight in children, according to a paper published this month in the British Journal of Nutrition.

–King's College London|2016-05-17

Can Plastic Program Your Baby to Be Obese?

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Benzyl butyl phthalate (BBP), a chemical commonly used in the food manufacturing process, can increase fat stores in the body even before we’re born, according to a new study published in the Journal of Molecular and Cellular Endocrinology.

–Texas A&M University|2016-05-17

Mom's Exposure to BPA During Pregnancy Can Put Her Baby on Course to Obesity

94 percent of pregnant women studied had detectable levels of BPA, a chemical used in water bottles, canned foods, and paper receipts.

–Columbia University, Mailman School of Public Health|2016-05-17

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