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Science

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livestock management, Animal Welfare, livestock GPS tracking

Researchers From New Mexico and Australia Collaborate on GPS Tracking Technology to Ensure Animal Welfare

Animal welfare on huge rangelands is a challenge. Researchers in New Mexico and Australia are collaborating to find ways to help ranchers better manage livestock and improve animal welfare. Researchers in Australia are very close to having real-time or near real-time GPS tracking of livestock.

Science

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Predator or Not? Invasive Snails Hide Even When They Don't Know

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The specific cues that trigger an animal’s natural defense vary depending on the species and its history in the ecosystem, a new University of Washington study finds.

Science

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Paleobiology, Megafaunal extinction, Australia, Climate Change, Global Warming, Paleontology

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 26-Jan-2017 3:00 PM EST

Science

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Little Tortoise, Big Range

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WCS scientists have discovered the impressed tortoise (Manouria impressa) in the Hukaung Valley Wildlife Sanctuary in northern Myanmar, some 528 miles from its known range in that country.

Science

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BREAKING SCIENCE NEWS: Wildlife-Snaring Crisis in Asian Forests

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A very important article (link) co-authored by WCS scientist Tony Lynam has been published in this week’s Science about a crisis emerging in Asia from snaring, which is wiping out wildlife in unprecedented numbers.

Science

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Dr. Nir Sapir, University Of Haifa, Insect Migration

New Study Reveals That Insects Also Migrate

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The researchers found that insects engage in the largest continental migration on earth. Some 3.5 trillion insects in Southern Britain alone migrate each year – a biomass eight times that of bird migration.

Science

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Climate Change

Climate Change Prompts Alaska Fish to Change Breeding Behavior

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A new University of Washington study finds that one of Alaska’s most abundant freshwater fish species is altering its breeding patterns in response to climate change, which could impact the ecology of northern lakes that already acutely feel the effects of a changing climate.

Science

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The Tasmanian Tiger Had a Brain Structure Suited to a Predatory Life Style

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Brain scans suggest the action-planning part of the cortex was large in these extinct predators.

Science

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Wildlife, Avian Influenza, Weather, Waterfowl, Entomology, Ecology, poultry farms , California, U.S. Geological Survey

Researchers Use Weather Radar to Track Migrating Waterfowl, Avian Influenza

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University of Delaware researchers are part of an effort that will use weather radar to identify wetland hotspots used by waterfowl during the winter, which in turn can alert poultry growers about the potential risk of avian influenza. The lab at UD is one of the only labs anywhere using weather radar data to map bird distributions at the ground level.

Science

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Kazakhstan, Wildlife, Tigers, Extinction, Central Asia, Biological Conservation

Tigers Could Roam Again in Central Asia, Scientists Say

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Caspian tigers, some of the largest cats that ever lived, roamed through much of Central Asia before they were designated as extinct in the middle of the 20th century. But there is a chance that tigers — using a subspecies that is nearly identical, genetically, to the Caspian — could be restored to Central Asia.

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Are Herders and Livestock Bad for Rare Wildlife? It’s Complicated.

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The Denver Zoological Foundation, WCS(Wildlife Conservation Society) and other partners have published a paper appearing in the early view edition of Conservation Biology that looks at the positive and negative relationships occurring between pastoralists, livestock, native carnivores and native herbivores in the world’s largest unfenced grassland and desert.

Science

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Exeter Research Helps Protect Loggerhead Turtles

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A long-running research and conservation project is helping save an at-risk species of turtle.

Medicine

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Mapping Movements of Alien Bird Species

The global map of alien bird species has been produced for the first time by a UCL-led team of researchers. It shows that human activities are the main determinants of how many alien bird species live in an area but that alien species are most successful in areas already rich with native bird species.

Science

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bats, place cells, grid cells, Memory, Ulanovsky

Found: Neurons That Orient Bats Toward Destination

Bats – like humans – can find their favorite fruit stand (or coffee shop) even when it’s hidden behind a screen or tall buildings. How? The Weizmann Institute of Science’s Prof. Nachum Ulanovsky and team have now identified the neurons that point bats in the right direction, even when their destination is obscured. This could aid understanding of some aspects of Alzheimer’s.

Science

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Climate Change, Kansas State University, K-State, Andrew Hope, Division of Biology, KSU, Warming, shrews, Small Mammals, insectivors, Arctic, Parasites, Ecosystems, Ecology

'Shrew'-D Advice: Study of Arctic Shrews, Parasites Indicates How Climate Change May Affect Ecosystems and Communities

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MANHATTAN, KANSAS — The shrew and its parasites — even 40-year-old preserved ones — are the new indicators of environmental change, according to a Kansas State University researcher. Andrew Hope, Kansas State University research assistant professor in the Division of Biology, and his colleagues across the U.S. have published "Shrews and Their Parasites: Small Species Indicate Big Changes" in the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's 2016 Arctic Report Card.

Science

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Missouri University of Science and Technology, ants, Biology, Society, Insects

Ants Need Work-Life Balance, Research Suggests

The work habits of ants could provide valuable insight into making our societies more productive and sustainable, says a team of Missouri S&T researchers.

Science

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Caribbean Bats Need 8 Million Years to Recover From Recent Extinction Waves

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Can nature restore the numbers of species on islands to levels that existed before human arrival? How long would it take for nature to regain this diversity? To answer these questions, a research team compiled data on Caribbean bats and their close relatives in a paper published in Nature Ecology and Evolution.

Science

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Bumblebee, neonicotinoids, imidacloprid

Neonicotinoid Pesticide Affects Foraging and Social Interaction in Bumblebees

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linked changes in social behavior with sublethal exposure to the neonicotinoid pesticide, imidacloprid.

Science

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Rocky Mountain Haze

University of Utah atmospheric scientist Gannet Hallar and colleagues find a correlation between the severity of drought in the Intermountain West and the summertime air quality, particularly the concentration of aerosol particles, in remote mountain wilderness regions.

Science

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Bernhardt/Meier Laboratory , bees, Wildflowers, Pollination

Saint Louis University Scientists Discover Bees Prefer Warm Violets in Cool Forests

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Studies provide fresh insight into how such tiny wild flowers continue to thrive and reproduce.







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